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 DR. KERR'S CAREER TESTIMONY


 DR. KERR'S ARMS & TARTAN


 TULSA RACE WAR:
BACKGROUND


 TULSA RACE WAR OF 1921


 COURTHOUSE LYNCH MOB


 DR. KERR CONFRONTS MOB


 THE GREENWOOD BLACK COMMUNITY


 SANCTUARY FOR THE GREENWOOD BLACKS


. DESTRUCTION OF GREENWOOD


 MAN SAVED FROM LYNCHING


 DR. KERR REJECTS 'INTER-RACIAL COMMITTEE'


 LEGAL RIGHTS OF THE GREENWOOD BLACK


 LEGAL ANALYSIS OF RACE WAR


 DR. KERR AND THE 'COMMON PLAN'


 DR. KERR OFFERS RESIGNATION


 DR. KERR CONFRONTS TULSA LEADERSHIP


 OIL RICH TULSANS


 SCOTTISH CLANS & WHITE TRASH


 KERR REMAINS IN TULSA


 THE WORLD'S FIRST BAG PIPE OPERA


 OUTLINE


Richard  Lloyd  Jones  incites  1921  Tulsa  Race  War

 

Richard  Lloyd  Jones,
Publisher  of  The  Tulsa  Tribune
  Tulsa's  Most  Representative  Citizen….
Wrote  'TO  LYNCH  A  NIGGER  TONIGHT'  editorial  
in  Tuesday  31st  May  1921  issue  of  The  Tribune
The  great  opponent of  Dr.  Charles  W.  Kerr:

The 1921 Tulsa Race War originated on Monday, 30th May 1921, when a 19 year old Black shoe-shine-lad,  Dick Rowland,  stumbled against a white elevator operator when the elevator (lift) 'jerked'.   The elevator operator cried  out in pain.   Frightened, Dick Rowland ran off.   He was later arrested, held for questioning, and taken to the gaol on the top floor of the Tulsa County Courthouse.  

The racialist  publisher, Richard Lloyd Jones (first cousin of the famous architect, Frank Lloyd Wright), of The Tulsa Tribune maliciously printed an inflammatory account of the elevator incident in the Tuesday 31st May 1921 edition of The Tribune.  In his falsified published account Richard Lloyd Jones deliberately lied when he accused this Black youth of having scratch the elevator operator and torn her clothes.  In his inflammatory front page feature story,  Richard Lloyd Jones accused Dick Rowland of 'attempted rape' … which is the worst offence for which an American Black can be accused.

Richard Lloyd Jones also published an accompanying editorial entitled 'To Lynch a Nigger Tonight'  --   which incited Tulsans to come to the Courthouse for a 'lynching bee'.   (All record copies of this lynching  editorial   in this particular issue of The Tribune were later destroyed to cover up Richard Lloyd Jones' personal responsibility for inciting the 1921 Tulsa Race War.) 

Published in the early afternoon business news edition of The Tribune distributed solely in the commercial and office district of downtown Tulsa, this lynching editorial mobilised the entire business population of Tulsa:

Refusal of the Tulsa City Authorities to confiscated this lynching edition  of  The Tribune  to prevent the unlawful assemblage called for in Richard Lloyd Jones' editorial  as required by State law re 22 O.S. §§101, 102, 104, 105,  violated the Federal constitutional and statutory rights of Dick Rowland under 42 U.S.C.A. §1983.

 

Tulsa's  Keystone  Cops  abdicate  in  favour  of

lynch  mob  of  Tulsa's  most  upstanding  civic  boosters:

Example  of  'GREEN  COUNTRY' mistreatment  of Blacks.

 In response to The Tribune's editorial a huge howling lynch mob coming directly from their downtown offices in business dress gathered that afternoon and evening at the Tulsa County Courthouse demanding with fire in their eyes that the Sheriff hand the Black youth over to them for lynching.  This was the beginning of the 'Tulsa race riot'.

As had occurred in previous Tulsa lynchings, the Police completely abdicated their authority,  refused to disperse the lynch mob, and were, thus, tacitly consenting to the prospective lynching  of this youth incited by The Tribune.   (Such Police collaboration in the lynching of  Blacks is common in the South.).  Such Police abdication of responsibility imposed by State Law violated the Federal constitutional and statutory rights of Dick Rowland, the innocent Black youth falsely accused by The Tribune  under 42 U.S.C.A. 1983.

Within the past year there had been a particularly notorious lynching in Tulsa on 28 August 1920 in which the Tulsa Police Department fully  cooperated with a lynch mob in handing the accused man, Roy Belton, over to the lynch mob without a fight.  The Tulsa Police then accompanied the lynch mob to the site of the lynching where the Police directed traffic  as at a carnival  -- so that all would have an opportunity to see the lynching.   By 1921 Oklahoma had a record of having 140 previous lynchings -- most of whom  were  racially oppressed Blacks or helpless Indians  --  by the State's poor white majority  who had invaded Oklahoma during the Land Grab era of the 1890's and 1900's to seize 'free' Indian lands offered by the Federal Government at the expense of Oklahoma's Indian Nations….

In Tulsa's Greenwood Black district, Black World War One Veterans organised themselves to prevent this lynching.  These Black Veterans had been front line  combat soldiers in France and were highly decorated by the French, Belgian, and British Governments for battle field heroism.  Dressed in their old army uniforms,  these Greenwood Veterans formed themselves into a troop of some 60 to 75 Black Veterans. 

These Greenwood Veterans were armed with weapons which the American Government allowed them to keep after World War One as souvenirs. 

The Black Veterans repeatedly notified both the Tulsa Sheriff's Office and the Tulsa Police Department that they would be marching up from Greenwood (in north Tulsa) to the Courthouse (in downtown Tulsa) for the specific purpose of offering a lawful resistance under State law (21 O.S. §643(3); 22 O.S. §33; 6 Okla Law Review 231) sufficient (1)  to protect the Courthouse from the lynch mob, (2)  to prevent the lynching-murder of the Black youth  ...  (3) to insure that Dick Rowland would live to stand trial of the false charges brought against him by The Tribune.  The Tulsa Police Department was very noncommittal  ... about what they might do....

The Greenwood Veterans repeatedly telephoned the Police that they would be wearing their old World War One uniforms and decorations in order to publicly evidence their intention to uphold law,  order,  and due process of law guaranteed constitutionally  to all Americans.  

Decorated  Greenwood  Veterans:  
Marched  armed  to  offer  sufficient  resistance  to  protect
Courthouse and to prevent the lynch mob from murdering a Black youth:
Actions  lawful  re  21  Oklahoma  Statutes §643(3)
ˇ Legitimate  GREEN  COUNTRY  heroes !

Fearing mass violence, Greenwood's Black Pastors had unsuccessfully tried to dissuade the armed Greenwood Veterans from marching to the Courthouse: These Black Veterans told the Greenwood Ministers that if they were considered to be good enough by the Federal Government to become American Soldiers to fight for democracy in France against the Kaiser's;  tyranny,   that they ought to be 'good enough' to receive the same democracy from American Governments in Tulsa and in Oklahoma.

The Greenwood Pastors had also repetitively telephoned the Sheriff and the Police to request them to disperse the lynch mob and to prevent the Black youth from being lynched --  so that there would be no reason for the Veterans to march:   The Tulsa Police refused to commit themselves to protect the Courthouse or to prevent the lynching..

This non-committal attitude of Tulsa's City Authorities convinced the Greenwood Veterans that, once again, the Tulsa Police Department was acquiescing to the prospective lynching of Dick Rowland incited by Richard Lloyd Jones and The Tulsa Tribune    just as the Police had done at the 28 August 1920 lynching of Roy Belton.  The Greenwood Veterans decided to march to prevent another innocent Black from being lynched by racialist Tulsans of poor white origins enriched by the discovery of oil with the tacit consent of Tulsa's  City Government and the Police by refusing  to perform  statutory duties imposed by Oklahoma law on municipalities to disperse unlawful assemblies  re 22 O.S. §§101, 102, 104 .  Such refusal was a Federal constitutional tort  re  42 U.S.C.A. §1983.